TEXTBOOK RESOURCES online vocab flashcards, review games, etc. Check this out!!!!Online Textbook!!!! Access your book from home. Password B4F38018E4For some reason, the online book works best in Internet Explorer, NOT Google Chrome. If you need to use google chrome, there is online help if you can't get past the cover. Click Here for online Help for Chrome users

This is the District Curriculum. This gives the major topics covered in each unit, pacing guide, and the essential vocabulary. Great study tool!

Online Map games

Assignments


Learning Targets

Mrs. Gac’s Classroom Expectations: United States History

This is a full year, required course. All students must pass this class in order to graduate.
¨ You must bring your textbook, paper, and a writing utensil every day. Bring a pencil to all exams.

¨ All assignments must be typed or written on loose leaf paper—no spiral paper will be accepted.

¨ Homework is an important part of the learning experience. It helps review material learned, prepare for class discussions, and teaches responsibility. You will not have a homework assignment every day; however the assignments I do give are important and will adversely affect your grade if you choose not to complete them.

¨ All examinations will be a combination of objective and essay questions. It is important for students to be able to argue and defend a thesis and this skill will be emphasized throughout the course.

¨ Copied or plagiarized homework or exams will result in a zero for all individuals involved. “We worked together” is not a valid excuse.

¨ We will have many class discussions and debates, and my examinations are always based on material covered in class. It is very important that you are in class every day. Many of the activities and discussions we will have in class can not be duplicated by reading your textbook and it will be difficult to keep up with the class if you are frequently absent. Daily attendance, contribution, and participation are necessary for successful completion of this course.

¨ YOU are responsible for finding out what you missed in class. Please ask another student for their class notes, or send me an email and I can forward Powerpoint slides that we used in class that day. Classroom policy on makeup work: 1 day for each day absent.

¨ Late assignments will be accepted with a grade reduction up to 5 school days late. Rarely do I give assignments that are due the next day, so you need to be responsible for keeping track of due dates and being organized.

¨ Absence on a review day before an exam does NOT excuse you from that exam or quiz on test day. If you are absent on an exam day or quiz day, you must make it up in the testing center (located in the library) on the day you return.

¨ Grade Calculations First Semester: 85% Semester Coursework (Which is calculated by 50% Exams, 20% Essays/Quizzes/ Projects, 20% HW, 10% Vocabulary) and 15% Final Exam

Please be aware of the BHS grading policy. 100% of all summative assessments (Exams, essays, quizzes, projects), as well as a minimum of 60% of all other work must be completed to be allowed to take the final exam. In addition, Students who do not take the final exam are given an incomplete, which converts to a failing grade after ten days if the final is not made up.

Grading Scale: 4= A (Mastery); 3=B (Proficient); 2=C (Basic); 1=D (Below Basic); 0= No evidence

As the department, school, and district move toward full implementation of Standards Based Grading, policy revision may be required.
Any changes in policy will be communicated via letter and/o Infinite Campus message.


If at any time you need assistance, please ask! kristengac@u-46.org

United States History Course Outline

First Quarter
I. Causes and Effects of the Civil War(Ch 1-4)
II. American Frontier (Ch 5)
III. Industrialization and Immigration (Ch 6, 7)
IV. Progressivism, Imperialism (Ch 7-10)
Second Quarter
V. World War I (Ch 11)
VI. 1920s (Ch 12-13)
VII. Great Depression (Ch 14-15)
First Semester District Final Exam covers Chapters 1-15
Third Quarter
I. World War II (Ch 16-17)
II. Cold War Beginnings, 1950s (Ch 18-19)
III. Kennedy and Johnson (Ch 20)
Fourth Quarter
IV. Civil Rights (Ch 21)
V. Vietnam (Ch 22)
VI. Nixon, 60s and 70s social change (Ch 23-24)
VII. Carter to the present